NEWS

New app channels your complaint to nearest local council

6 Feb 2020, 10:04 pm

Updated 2 months ago

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Want to make sure your community issues are heard?

Well, the recently launched "ACTnow" is the first mobile app in Malaysia to connect communities with 155 local councils nationwide.

It serves as a platform for the community to report issues to local councils and what's more - it's automated so a user does not even need to know where they are when filing a complaint.

"Your complaint will automatically be sent by ACTnow to the nearest local authority," the app's developer Melvin Lam told Malaysiakini.

"This will empower the rakyat so that their reports can be raised with the local authorities.

According to Lam, popular issues that users want to highlight include illegal businesses, dumping of garbage, abandoned vehicles and houses, illegal buntings, loan shark posters, potholes and smoking in eateries.

 

"For example, a user was in a park in Nilai, which is not their usual area. But they took a picture of a broken seesaw which they felt would be dangerous to children.

"When they submitted the complaint, the issue was addressed immediately," said Lam.

All a user has to do is download the multilingual app, snap a photo or record a short video, type in the text in your smartphone and the complaint will be delivered to the authorities.

"Every complaint is submitted through the ActNow office and not the person - so it's viewed as a legitimate complaint," Lam explained.

Melvin Lam

To avoid fake claims, ActNow only accepts real-time complaints accompanied by original photos or videos.

"We don't want to be spreading fake news. We have a review system in our office so that it's genuine and relevant to the council."

"For example, somebody asked for help for a homeless man. This was not relevant to the MPSJ (Subang Jaya Municipal Council) but we contacted the Subang Jaya state assemblyperson Michelle Ng who got in touch with the Welfare Department who were able to assist," he explained.

Lam, CS Goh and Nick Neng spent about a year developing the app with their own funds.

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